Weekly News Round Up, May 18, 2012

On Fridays, I post some of the more interesting articles I've come across throughout the week to help you keep current on what's happening in the the church, both in America and abroad. I also post up some fun things that I come across. I post these up to inform and get you thinking, not because I endorse the content.

Hindus want to take back yoga

A Hindu organization is fighting to take back yoga, saying that America’s version of the practice has lost its meaningful roots.

The Hindu American Foundation launched the “Take Back Yoga” campaign not to convert Westerners to Hinduism or urge them to cease practicing it altogether, but to remind people that yoga is rooted in Hindu philosophy.

Mother's Day packs church pews behind Christmas, Easter

Hold the chocolate and flowers. Hold the brunch reservations. What mom may really want for Mother's Day is for the whole gang to go to church first.

A new survey of 1,000 Protestant pastors finds Mother's Day ranks right after Easter and Christmas in peak church attendance.

Beaverton church sues family after they criticize it online

BEAVERTON, Ore. - A church pastor is suing a mother and daughter for $500,000 because they gave the church bad reviews online.

The family being sued left the church a few years ago and Julie Anne Smith says she and her family were shunned and couldn't understand why. So she went online and wrote Google and DEX reviews of the church and then started a blog.

Across country, black pastors weigh in on Obama's same-sex marriage support

Washington (CNN) - Addressing his large, mostly black congregation on Sunday morning, the Rev. Wallace Charles Smith did not mince words about where he stood on President Barack Obama's newly announced support for same-sex marriage: The church is against it, he said, prompting shouts of "Amen!" from the pews.

Young ‘Millennials’ losing faith in record numbers

WASHINGTON (RNS) A growing tide of young Americans is drifting away from the religions of their childhood -- and most of them are ending up in no religion at all.

One in four young adults choose “unaffiliated” when asked about their religion, according to a new report from the Public Religion Research Institute and Georgetown University’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs.